My experimental writing method that seems to be working


I’ve been trying something new with my writing sessions that’s been somewhat revolutionary for me. I used to sit down at the computer and write until I couldn’t write anymore. Hours would pass and on a good day, I would maybe get out 1500 words. Most of the time it was just 1000. I decided to try interval sessions. I write 500 words and take a break. I’ll either spend 30 minutes to an hour eating or exercising or writing a blog post, something to get my mind off of the book. After the break, I come back and write another 500 words and then break again. The first week using this method, I was cranking out 2700 words a day. Now I’m doing over 3300 words a day. It really has removed the pressure of writing “a lot” of words. For some reason, my mind can deal with 500 words at a time much better than write until you can’t write any more in one sitting. I like it so much that I’m toying with a crazy resolution to write six books next year using this method. The most I’ve done is two in a year. I’ll keep you posted on that.

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2 thoughts on “My experimental writing method that seems to be working

  1. Well, I am going to try this. I am having a very hard time balancing work (big one!), blogging, other writing (poetry) and working on novel manuscripts. Okay, that’s a lot to balance, but I really feel like the novels are probably the most important to me (other than work which is, of course, a necessity), and just can’t get myself to focus. I’m glad to follow your experiment. K.

    • Good luck. The key is to force yourself to stop at whatever you set as your maximum word count. Given your schedule, you might even want to set yours at 250 words or so. At night, I write my 500 words, watch an episode of 30 Rock with my wife on Netflix and then write 500 more words and so forth and so on. We writers are always writing, even when we’re not anywhere near our computers or a pen. It’s just hard to turn off. When we are actually physically writing, it’s intense. That intensity is hard to maintain for hours at a time. Short periods of intense focus work much better for me. Let me know how it works.

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