What I’m Reading Now – The Passage by Justin Cronin

I’m reading The Passage by Justin Cronin.  I picked the book up because while watching an interview with Cronin on one of the morning shows, I witnessed something remarkable.  Stephen King called in to give a compliment to Cronin and take a cheap shot at Stephenie Meyer at the same time.  He praised The Passage and then said, “Thanks for making vampires scary again.”  HA!  Without mention the teen vampire queen’s name, he figuratively delivered a roundhouse left to her chin.  Ouch!

Needless to say, I had to have Cronin’s book, and King wasn’t lying.  The book is amazing.  It’s not just  a good read.  It’s a great time.  I’m loving it.  Cronin has infused character into an apocalyptic vampire novel that makes the book a genre buster.  It’s good writing, good storytelling, incredible reading.

Love the book, and love King’s inexplicable need to criticize Meyer every chance he gets.

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Swine Flu – Color me concerned!

Oh, my God!  The Swine Flu apparently makes you breakout in denim!

Oh, my God! The Swine Flu apparently makes you breakout in denim!

Picture this – I’m going through my normal routine this morning; relaxing, drinking some coffee, getting the trash together for trash day, making sure the dog empties her bladder out in the yard and not in the kitchen.  It’s business as usual.  One of the morning shows is on, but I’m not really paying much attention.  It’s just noise.  Suddenly I hear Kathleen Sebelius’, Secretary of Health and Human Services, voice coming from the TV.  I turn and hear her say, “We are concerned that American’s aren’t taking the H1N1 Flu seriously enough.”  I swallow my coffee with a loud, almost painful gulp.  She said it in a calm, even tone that did not connote any kind emergency situation, but in my head I heard her telling me to panic, to get on my knees and pray to my God for ever-loving mercy, that the Swine Flu is going to kill us all.  She’s the person who’s been put in charge of our nation’s health, and she basically just said we need to call the priest to administer Last Rites.  I’m concerned that she is concerned that we are not concerned enough.  It’s Stephen King’s The Stand coming to life.  Things did not go well in that book, people.  I am a student of apocalyptic situations, and I have to tell you that the viral apocalypse scenario is the worst.  People turn on each other.  The military kills civilians with impunity.  The chance for a zombie uprising is at its absolute highest.  And I’m pretty sure the virus will bring Hitler, Stalin, and Carrot Top back to life…. Wait, I’ve just been informed Carrot Top is alive!  It’s begun!  This is not good.  Run, run as fast as you can!

You got what you wanted, Madam Secretary.  I’m scared out of my mind!  Thank you!

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Viggo Mortensen to Star in The Road

They are adapting Cormac McCarthy’s brilliant novel, The Road, for the big screen and Viggo Mortensen is playing the father. The son is being played by Kodi Smit-McPhee (Yeah, me either). The book was so incredible I don’t have a lot of faith the movie will live up to the original. Mortensen is a great choice so that does give me some hope. This is from NY Times article:

Viggo Mortensen, who plays the father, said the same thing. “It’s a love story that’s also an endurance contest,” he explained, and quickly added: “I mean that in a positive way. They’re on this difficult journey, and the father is basically learning from the son. So if the father-son thing doesn’t work, then the movie doesn’t work. The rest of it wouldn’t matter. It would never be more than a pretty good movie. But with Kodi in it, it has a chance to be an extremely good movie, maybe even a great one.”

I’ve said it before. I’ll say it again. You could almost replace the words “The Road” and with the words “The Old Man and The Sea,” and you wouldn’t skip a beat. Same theme. Same sort of literary genius behind the work.

You can read the entire article here: At World’s End, Honing a Father-Son Dynamic